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Naturalist Notebook 

October 23, 2011

Who Pooped?

Photobucket
Photo: N. Sincero 2011, Scat Wrangler: S. Sumrall



This scat may be up to five times longer than it is wide and it may contain undigested insect parts. You can find it in western North America, near lakes or ponds. It is getting less common, however; ICUN Red List reports this species is probably in significant decline due to diseases such as chytridiomycosis.



Who pooped?



Leave a comment below with your guess. We will reveal the answer in the comments section on Wednesday, October 26th.



If you have your own natural history mystery (an unidentified animal, plant or other specimen), send a photo or two to naturalist@calacademy.org. We’ll do our best to help out. Please include location, date and any other details that seem pertinent.


Sources:

ICUN Red List at http://www.iucnredlist.org/ (retrieved August 20th, 2011)

Scats and Tracks of the Pacific Coast, Including British Columbia: A Field Guide to the Signs of 70 Wildlife Species / James C. Halfpenny ; illustrated by Todd Telander. Helena, Mont. : Falcon, c1999. Naturalist Center Reference QL768 .H36 1999


Filed under: Who Pooped — nature @ 8:39 am

October 16, 2011

Who Pooped?

1028
Photo: N. Sincero 2011, Scat Wrangler: S. Sumrall



The composition of this scat varies widely. It may contain fur (particularly rabbit), berries, insects and plant matter. You might find it in fields and woods, particularly in riparian habitats.



Who pooped?



Leave a comment below with your guess. We will reveal the answer in the comments section on Wednesday, October 19th.



If you have your own natural history mystery (an unidentified animal, plant or other specimen), send a photo or two to naturalist@calacademy.org. We’ll do our best to help out. Please include location, date and any other details that seem pertinent.



Source:

Scats and Tracks of the Pacific Coast, Including British Columbia: A Field Guide to the Signs of 70 Wildlife Species / James C. Halfpenny ; illustrated by Todd Telander. Helena, Mont. : Falcon, c1999. Naturalist Center Reference QL768 .H36 1999


Filed under: Who Pooped — nature @ 8:42 am

September 30, 2011

Who Pooped?

Photobucket
Replica Scat Photo: N. Sincero 2011, Scat Wrangler: S. Sumrall



This scat can vary widely in color but is most often black. You might find scat from more than one individual in a pile. But you would not want to touch or even smell this scat, particularly because it may contain a deadly parasite.



Who pooped?



Leave a comment below with your guess. We will reveal the answer in the comments section on Tuesday, October 4th.



If you have your own natural history mystery (an unidentified animal, plant or other specimen), send a photo or two to naturalist@calacademy.org. We’ll do our best to help out. Please include location, date and any other details that seem pertinent.



Source:

Scats and Tracks of the Pacific Coast, Including British Columbia: A Field Guide to the Signs of 70 Wildlife Species / James C. Halfpenny ; illustrated by Todd Telander. Helena, Mont. : Falcon, c1999. Naturalist Center Reference QL768 .H36 1999


Filed under: Who Pooped — nature @ 7:33 am

September 23, 2011

Who Pooped?

Use this one
Scat Photo: N. Sincero 2011, Scat Wrangler: S. Sumrall

This scat changes depending on the time of year. It consists of many pellets, which may scatter or, when moist, may stick together. It can be found in forested areas on the Pacific Coast.

Who pooped?

Leave a comment below with your guess. We will reveal the answer in the comments section on Tuesday, September 27th.

If you have your own natural history mystery (an unidentified animal, plant or other specimen), send a photo or two to naturalist@calacademy.org. We’ll do our best to help out. Please include location, date and any other details that seem pertinent.

Source:

Scats and Tracks of the Pacific Coast, including British Columbia: A Field Guide to the Signs of 70 Wildlife Species / James C. Halfpenny; illustrated by Todd Telander. Helena, Mont.: Falcon, c1999. Naturalist Center Reference QL768 .H36 1999


Filed under: Who Pooped — nature @ 8:00 am

September 16, 2011

Who Pooped?

User this one
Replica Scat Photo: N. Sincero 2011, Scat Wrangler: S. Sumrall



This scat can reach up to 8.8 cm (3.5 in) in length. It is a distinctive green color, often with a nitrogenous white coating. You can find this scat all over North America, but you’re more likely to see it in the south during the winter months.



Who pooped?



Leave a comment below with your guess. We will reveal the answer in the comments section on Tuesday, September 20th.



If you have your own natural history mystery (an unidentified animal, plant or other specimen), send a photo or two to naturalist@calacademy.org. We’ll do our best to help out. Please include location, date and any other details that seem pertinent.



Sources:

Scats and Tracks of the Pacific Coast, including British Columbia: A Field Guide to the Signs of 70 Wildlife Species / James C. Halfpenny; illustrated by Todd Telander. Helena, Mont.: Falcon, c1999. Naturalist Center Reference QL768 .H36 1999


Filed under: Who Pooped — nature @ 8:00 am
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