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Naturalist Notebook 

September 9, 2011

Who Pooped?

Use this one
Replica Scat Photo: N. Sincero 2011, Scat Wrangler: S. Sumrall



This scat is composed of small, dry pellets filled with plant material. This scat can be found in a wide range of habitats stretching from Southern Canada to Bolivia.



Who pooped?



Leave a comment below with your guess. We will reveal the answer on in the comments section on Tuesday, September 13th.



If you have your own natural history mystery (an unidentified animal, plant or other specimen), send a photo or two to naturalist@calacademy.org. We’ll do our best to help out. Please include location, date and any other details that seem pertinent.



Source:

Scats and Tracks of the Pacific Coast, Including British Columbia: A Field Guide to the Signs of 70 Wildlife Species / James C. Halfpenny ; illustrated by Todd Telander. Helena, Mont. : Falcon, c1999. Naturalist Center Reference QL768 .H36 1999


Filed under: Who Pooped — nature @ 11:20 am

September 2, 2011

Who Pooped?

Use this one.
Scat Photo: CAS 2011, Scat Wrangler: S. Sumrall



This dung has plenty of fibrous material from grasses. It is often found relatively close to where humans live. Some people even collect it, dry it and use it as fuel!



Who pooped?



Leave a comment below with your guess. We will reveal the answer in the comments section on Tuesday, September 6th.



If you have your own natural history mystery (an unidentified animal, plant or other specimen), send a photo or two to naturalist@calacademy.org. We’ll do our best to help out. Please include location, date and any other details that seem pertinent.


Filed under: Who Pooped — nature @ 9:07 am

August 26, 2011

Who Pooped?

Photobucket
Scat Photo: CAS 2011



The dropping of this animal comes out together in three separate parts: a whitish-gray part, a dark brown part, and a ball of indigestible matter such as hair, feathers or fur. You can see the animal that made this scat here at the Academy of Sciences.



Who pooped?



Leave a comment below with your guess. We will reveal the answer in the comments section on Tuesday, August 30th



If you have your own natural history mystery (an unidentified animal, plant or other specimen), send a photo or two to naturalist@calacademy.org. We’ll do our best to help out. Please include location, date and any other details that seem pertinent.


Filed under: Who Pooped — nature @ 8:54 am

August 19, 2011

Who Pooped?

Use this one
Scat Photo: N. Sincero 2011, Scat Wrangler: S. Sumrall



This scat is very large! It contains a lot of fibrous materials, from things like grasses and trees. You might find it in the African savanna or jungle.



Who pooped?



Leave a comment below with your guess. We will reveal the answer on Tuesday, August 23rd.



This month we have a special display on Africa which includes books and specimens, including the one featured above. Don’t worry, it is safely enclosed in a display box. Come visit us in The Naturalist Center on the third floor here at the California Academy of Sciences if you’d like to see it in person.



Source:
The Encyclopedia of Mammals / edited by David Macdonald. New York: Facts on File, c1984. Naturalist Center Reference QL703 .E53 1984


Filed under: Who Pooped — nature @ 9:12 am

August 12, 2011

Who Pooped?

Use this one
Replica Scat Photo: N. Sincero 2011, Scat Wrangler: S. Sumrall



This scat may be buried or have dirt scraped over it. It is generally firm with a few constrictions, but can be looser and drier depending on how dried out the scat-maker’s meal is. This scat can be found in western North America, Florida and South America.



Who pooped?



Leave a comment below with your guess. If no one gets it right, we will reveal the answer in one week.



If you have your own natural history mystery (an unidentified animal, plant or other specimen), send a photo or two to naturalist@calacademy.org. We’ll do our best to help out. Please include location, date and any other details that seem pertinent.



Source:
Scats and Tracks of the Pacific Coast, Including British Columbia: A Field Guide to the Signs of 70 Wildlife Species / James C. Halfpenny ; illustrated by Todd Telander. Helena, Mont. : Falcon, c1999. Naturalist Center Reference QL768 .H36 1999


Filed under: Who Pooped — nature @ 9:46 am
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