• Getting a close-up look at an insect during a bioblitz
    Getting a close-up look at an insect during a bioblitz
  • Bioblitzing Lake Merritt in Oakland
    Exploring Lake Merritt in Oakland
  • Documenting organisms on the docks of San Francisco Bay
    Documenting organisms on the docks of San Francisco Bay
  • Looking for birds at a bioblitz in San Francisco
    Looking for birds at a bioblitz in San Francisco
  • Documenting a newt during a bioblitz
    Documenting a newt during a bioblitz

Bioblitzes are gatherings of scientists, citizen scientists, land managers, and more, all working together to find and identify as many different species as possible. Bioblitzes not only help land managers build a species list and atlas for their park and provide invaluable data for researchers, they also highlight the incredible biodiversity in these Bay Area oases.

Our bioblitzes are open to anyone and are family-friendly. Just bring your smartphone with the iNaturalist app, your curiosity, and your powers of observation to help catalog the natural wonders of our parks and open spaces.

Check below to find out about upcoming grassroots bioblitzes. Links will be live once the bioblitz is open for registration. Registration is free, but be sure to let us know you're coming so we can send you all the information you need prior to the bioblitz!

 

Saturday, March 25: Junipero Serra Park Bioblitz
Junipero Serra Park

Join San Mateo County Parks, the Sequoia Audubon Society, and the California Academy of Sciences for a bioblitz at Junipero Serra Park! Nestled behind the cities of Millbrae and San Bruno, Junipero Serra Park affords a spectacular panorama of the Bay Area with unequaled views to San Bruno Mountain, San Francisco Airport, San Francisco Bay and Mount Diablo. Visitors are drawn to the oak foothill plant community, spring wildflowers, El Zanjon Creek, and the peacefulness of the park.

Photo by Michael Fraley.

Saturday, March 25: Roy's Redwoods Preserve Bioblitz
Redwoods

Join Marin County Parks and One Tam at the scenic Roy's Redwoods Preserve as we try to identify and document every living species we see! Hone your naturalist skills, learn to use the iNaturalist smartphone app, and contribute valuable data about our region's biodiversity. We will be exploring redwood forest, meadow, grassland, and riparian areas, and we expect to see early spring wildflowers!

Saturday, April 1: Pier 94 Bioblitz
Pier 94

Join Golden Gate Audubon, the EcoCenter at Heron's Head Park, the Port of San Francisco, and the California Academy of Sciences in bioblitzing this hidden gem along the bay in southeast San Francisco! Nature—with the help of hardworking Golden Gate Audubon volunteers—is reclaiming a hidden wetland consisting of nearly five acres of isolated industrial land near Pier 94 on San Francisco’s southern waterfront. Located in the shadow of container ships and heavy equipment, the restored salt marsh and adjacent upland provides valuable habitat for birds, butterflies, and small mammals.

2014 Bay Nature article about Pier 94

Wednesday, April 5: Yerba Buena Island Bioblitz
Yerba Buena Island - photo from http://clui.org/ludb/site/coast-guard-vessel-tracking-station

Join the San Francisco Department of the Environment, the Treasure Island Development Authority, and the California Academy of Sciences as we explore Yerba Buena Island and document its species! Registration is limited, so sign up soon!

April 14-18: City Nature Challenge
City Nature Challenge

The City Nature Challenge is back! We had such a great time last year with San Francisco vs Los Angeles that we're doing it again - but this time with cities across the United States joining in! There are 16 cities from Seattle to Miami, from LA to NYC, from Chicago to Houston, all taking part in City Nature Challenge 2017!

Saturday, April 15: Ring Mountain Bioblitz
Ring Mountain

In celebration of national Citizen Science Day and in support of the City Nature Challenge, join the California Academy of Sciences and Marin Country Day School in a bioblitz of Ring Mountain!

The unique geology and microclimate of this location provide a home for a number of rare plants. The soils on the ridge are heavily laced with the mineral serpentine. Soils derived from this mineral are toxic to most plants, but a number of species have evolved mechanisms to survive on serpentine. As a result, where serpentine soils are found, there are usually isolated populations of rare plants. The most extreme example of this phenomenon is the Tiburon Mariposa Lily, which is found on the upper slopes of Ring Mountain, and nowhere else on earth.

Saturday, April 15: Edgewood Park & Natural Preserve
Edgewood Park

In support of the City Nature Challenge and in celebration of National Citizen Science Day, Sequoia Audubon Society invites you to join San Mateo County's top iNaturalist enthusiasts for a morning at Edgewood County Park. Attend the Thursday night Sequoia Audubon Society program on 4/13/2017 to become familiar with iNaturalist and spend Saturday morning documenting all of the plants and flowers, insects including butterflies, herps, birds and other animals we can find. Be sure to download iNaturalist before arriving and bring a fully charged smart phone or camera.

Saturday, April 15: Green Hairstreak Butterfly Festival
Green Hairstreak

Join Nature in the City as they celebrate one of San Francisco's iconic butterfly species - the Green Hairstreak - in the corridor it flies along! Learn about the Green Hairstreak Butterfly Corridor and how this local butterfly is successfully thriving in this neighborhood. There will be games, activities, nature hikes, and our friends from Nerds for Nature will be leading a bioblitz of the area, giving you a chance to contribute to the City Nature Challenge by making iNaturalist observations at Hawk Hill and throughout the corridor!

Saturday, April 29: Homestead Valley Bioblitz
Mt. Tam from Berkeley

Join the National Park Service and One Tam at scenic Homestead Valley as we try to identify and document every living species we see! Hone your naturalist skills, learn to use the iNaturalist smartphone app, and contribute valuable data about Mt. Tam's biodiversity. We will be exploring coastal prairie and forested ridges to look for rare species and weeds alike!

Saturday, April 29: UCSC Campus Bioblitz
UCSC campus

Join staff from the UCSC Natural Reserves, Ken Norris Center for Natural History, the California Academy of Sciences, legions of enthusiastic UCSC students & alumni, and members of the Santa Cruz community as we come together for a full day exploring and documenting this campus's incredible biodiversity. UCSC's wide variety of habitats and unique geophysical setting have resulted in a great number of species that call campus home. Younger Lagoon Reserve, on the marine science campus at Long Marine Lab, will concurrently host a bioblitz from 9 am-12 pm.

Registration up soon!

Saturday, April 29: Younger Lagoon Reserve Bioblitz
Younger Lagoon

Join staff from the UCSC Natural Reserves, Ken Norris Center for Natural History, the California Academy of Sciences, legions of enthusiastic UCSC students & alumni, and members of the Santa Cruz community as we come together for a morning exploring and documenting Younger Lagoon Reserve's incredible biodiversity. One of the few relatively undisturbed wetlands remaining on the California Central Coast, the Younger Lagoon Reserve encompasses a remnant Y-shaped lagoon on the open coast just north of Monterey Bay. The lagoon system provides protected habitat for 100 resident and migratory bird species. The Campus Natural Reserve will concurrently host a bioblitz from 9 am-12 pm.

Registration up soon!

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Our bioblitzes are powered by iNaturalist, our in-house, citizen science platform. It's a community-powered website and app that makes it easy to upload and share your observations in the field and to get help from other users with flora and fauna IDs.

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