55 Music Concourse Dr.
Golden Gate Park
San Francisco CA
94118
415.379.8000
Regular Hours:

Daily

9:30 am – 5:00 pm

Sunday

11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Members' Hours:

Tuesday

8:30 – 9:30 am

Sunday

10:00 – 11:00 am
Closures
Notices

The Academy will be closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas Day.

Planetarium will be closed Sep. 22, 23, 24

 
Philippine Coral Reef Webcam

Field Guide

Made up of more than 7,000 islands, the Philippines is home to the world’s richest diversity of tropical marine life. The island chain supports more than 500 species of coral and 2,000 species of fish, making it a biodiversity hotspot and an important location for scientific research. This exhibit replicates some of the diversity found in this vital marine resource. See how many species listed below you can identify in the live video stream.

    • Foxface rabbitfish at the California Academy of Sciences

      Foxface rabbitfish

      Siganus unimaculatus
      Diet: algae, marine plants

    • Pyramid butterflyfish at the California Academy of Sciences

      Pyramid butterflyfish

      Hemitaurichthys polylepis
      Diet: zooplankton*

    • Blue-and-yellow fusilier at the California Academy of Sciences

      Blue-and-yellow fusilier

      Caesio teres
      Diet: zooplankton*

    • Palette tang at the California Academy of Sciences

      Palette tang

      Paracanthurus hepatus
      Diet: algae, marine plants, zooplankton*

    • Orange-shoulder surgeonfish at the California Academy of Sciences

      Orange-shoulder surgeonfish

      Acanthurus olivaceous
      Diet: algae, marine plants

    • Blue-spine unicornfish at the California Academy of Sciences

      Blue-spine unicornfish

      Naso unicornis
      Diet: algae, marine plants

    *Zooplankton refers to a wide variety of small invertebrate animals that drift with the ocean currents.

    • False clown anemonefish at the California Academy of Sciences

      False clown anemonefish

      Amphiprion ocellaris
      Diet: zooplankton*

    • Sixbar wrasse at the California Academy of Sciences

      Sixbar wrasse

      Thalassoma hardwicke
      Diet: crustaceans, small fish, clams

    • Oriental sweetlips at the California Academy of Sciences

      Oriental sweetlips

      Plectorhinchus vittatus
      Diet: crustaceans, starfish, worms, molluscs

    • Emperor anglefish at the California Academy of Sciences

      Emperor anglefish

      Pomacanthus imperator
      Diet: corals, sponges, algae, marine plants, tunicates, crustaceans

    • Clown tang at the California Academy of Sciences

      Clown tang

      Acanthurus lineatus
      Diet: algae, marine plants

    • Lyretail anthias at the California Academy of Sciences

      Lyretail anthias

      Pseudanthias squamipinnis
      Diet: zooplankton*

    *Zooplankton refers to a wide variety of small invertebrate animals that drift with the ocean currents.

    • Squarespot anthias at the California Academy of Sciences

      Squarespot anthias

      Pseudanthias pleurotaenia
      Diet: zooplankton*

    • Blackstriped angelfish at the California Academy of Sciences

      Blackstriped angelfish (male)

      Genicanthus lamarck
      Diet: zooplankton*

    • Double whiptail at the California Academy of Sciences

      Double whiptail

      Pentapodus emeryii
      Diet: brittlestars, marine worms, small fishes, zooplankton*

    • Blacktail damselfish at the California Academy of Sciences

      Blacktail damselfish

      Dascyllus melanurus
      Diet: algae, zooplankton*

    • Striped cleaner wrasse at the California Academy of Sciences

      Striped cleaner wrasse

      Labroides dimidiatus
      Diet: scales, mucus and parasites of other fishes

    • Purple Queen Anthias at the California Academy of Sciences

      Purple Queen Anthias

      Pseudanthias tuka
      Diet: zooplankton*

    *Zooplankton refers to a wide variety of small invertebrate animals that drift with the ocean currents.

    • Staghorn coral at the California Academy of Sciences

      Staghorn coral

      Acropora spp.

    • Plate coral at the California Academy of Sciences

      Plate coral

      Montipora capricornis

    • Green horn coral at the California Academy of Sciences

      Green horn coral

      Hydnophora spp.

    • Leather coral at the California Academy of Sciences

      Leather coral

      Sarcophyton spp.

    • Brain coral at the California Academy of Sciences

      Brain coral

      Leptoria spp.

    • Moon coral at the California Academy of Sciences

      Moon coral

      Acanthastrea spp.

    *Zooplankton refers to a wide variety of small invertebrate animals that drift with the ocean currents.

Coral Conservation

Although corals are tiny organisms, they construct some of the largest and most ecologically important structures in the world. Members of a diverse group that includes jellyfish and anemones, most corals live in extensive colonies, and many types form compartments around themselves made of rock-like calcium carbonate that protect them from predators. These tiny exoskeletons, replicated by countless coral polyps, serve as the building blocks for massive coral reefs that fringe coastlines around the world.

Unfortunately, the survival of approximately 75% of the world’s tropical coral reefs is currently under threat and 25% of Earth’s reefs have already been lost. Global warming and ocean acidification are two of the most important factors, but not the only threats. To better understand how to conserve and protect these fragile habitats, Academy scientists have begun cultivating coral donated from partnering aquariums and regional governments, as well as from clippings sustainably and legally harvested during expeditions. Some of the results of this work can be seen here in this unique 212,000-gallon exhibit.

To further this conservation effort, Academy biologists are working with the SECORE Foundation, a nonprofit organization that has pioneered new technologies to aid coral reproduction in the wild. Bart Shepherd, Director of Steinhart Aquarium, explains that SECORE’s approach uses special nets to collect sperm and egg bundles during spawning events that occur predictably in the wild during full moons. “A spawning event is like snowfall in reverse,” he says. “The white bundles of sperm and egg are buoyant and float upwards. Fertilization and development take place right on the surface of the water.” Using SECORE’s approach, we fertilize the eggs in the lab, culture the larvae for a few days and then settle them onto specialized tiles that can be planted back out on the reef.

Collecting these gametes for cultivation and returning juvenile corals to the wild can help damaged reefs recover and give them a better chance of surviving long into the future. Until now, the Foundation has focused its efforts in the Caribbean. Now, using these techniques, SECORE and Academy researchers will be working in an area that surrounds the Philippines called the Coral Triangle in an effort to restore and strengthen biodiversity in this unique underwater habitat.

Learn more about the 2011 Philippine Biodiversity Expedition.

Learn more about SECORE Foundation.

Learn more about the Academy’s work to save coral in the wild.

Support Philippine
Typhoon Victims

   

The Academy has a long history of conducting scientific research and community outreach in the Philippines, and we are deeply saddened by the devastation that Typhoon Haiyan has wrought. If you would like to join us in supporting those affected by the storm, please consider making a donation to one of the following organizations:

Dive Show Live Feedings

   

Watch and listen as Academy divers feed the creatures in the Philippine Coral Reef exhibit and answer visitor questions—daily at 11:30 am and 2:30 pm PST.

Live Webcams

   

African penguins

Dive into the colony

Watch African penguins swim, waddle and glide.

Notice Anything Wrong?

   

Our live webcams are installed in very wet and salty environments, and with animals that can get rambunctious at times. If you notice anything that doesn’t seem quite right with any of the webcams, please let us know—click here to send us an email about it.

Visit the Steinhart
Aquarium

   

Learn more

Meet Bart Shepherd,
Science Hero!

   

Learn more

FAQs

   
  • When do the fish eat?

    Aside from the two daily dive shows, fish are fed randomly throughout the day by aquarium biologists and also by automatic feeding systems. Tight gatherings of fish usually indicate that food has been distributed in that area.

  • Why don’t I hear anything?

    Audio is available only during feeding times. Try watching the live stream daily at 11:30 am and 2:30 pm PST to hear Academy biologists answer visitor questions while they care for the fish. Enjoy!

  • Why is it dark?

    The fish may be sleeping. We dim and brighten our lights according to a schedule that best matches their natural habit. That may not correspond to the time zone where you are.

  • I’m seeing vertical color bars. Is the camera not working?

    There are occasions when the live web stream is disrupted. If you see a problem with our webcam, please email us at .

  • The webcam doesn’t work on my computer. What should I do?

    Try visiting the Academy’s Philippine Coral Reef Webcam on YouTube.