55 Music Concourse Dr.
Golden Gate Park
San Francisco CA
94118
415.379.8000
Regular Hours:

Daily

9:30 am – 5:00 pm

Sunday

11:00 am – 5:00 pm
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Tuesday

8:30 – 9:30 am

Sunday

10:00 – 11:00 am
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Live Penguin Cams 

October 16, 2009

Penguin Team Member: Brooke

dunker-brooke

Hello, everyone! My name is Brooke and I normally care for the penguins all day on Sunday and Monday as well as on Thursday mornings.  My favorite thing about working with these birds is that I find it impossible to be in a bad mood around them! Each one of our penguins has its own individual personality, complete with quirks.  Pete (black w/ white band on right wing) is my favorite. He can have a bad temper and is always getting into trouble. Dunker (yellow w/ black band on right wing), who I’m holding in this picture, is a close second. He is very sweet and likes to keep a low profile. I have known 7 of the birds in our colony since the day they hatched and it’s been amazing to be able to watch them grow from fist-sized fuzz balls into sleek adults. One of the many things I admire about penguins is how tough and resilient they are. For example, if they fall over or trip they will simply shake it off and continue on as if nothing happened. In this way, for me, they are role models. I am proud to be working at an institution that has a successful breeding program and that works to educate people about penguins and the difficulties they face. I am always happy to answer any questions and hope to see you all around the museum! -Brooke Weinstein


Filed under: CAS Penguin Colony — Penguins @ 10:04 am

9 Comments »

  1. I don’t blame you, Brooke!!!! I (just like my 5th grade teacher) am a penguin lover!!!!! I think they are the cutest birds!!!!!!!!!!!! Can you tell me when the “domestic” penguin chick eggs hatcth????

    Your Penguin Lover, Laura M. P.S.- Tell ALL the penguins I said HI!!!!!!!

    Comment by Laura M. — October 17, 2009 @ 2:50 pm

  2. Hello Laura, The penguins at the Academy take the same incubation time that penguins in South Africa do. The chicks take 37-39 days to start hatching out. Then take an addtional 1-2 days to come completely out of their shell.

    Comment by pschaller — October 17, 2009 @ 3:17 pm

  3. One could have worse role models! Look forward to following your posts!!

    Comment by Rafe — October 17, 2009 @ 8:40 pm

  4. Tell us about the leaves (that’s what they look like). They’re almost as big as the penguins. I’m guessing it is nesting material. Where do they get them? Sometimes it looks like they steal them from another nest.

    Comment by Patrice — October 21, 2009 @ 4:00 pm

  5. Hi Patrice, Yes, they are leaves that we offer for nest material. We place about 30-40 in the exhibit at least once per week. The penguins collect them and place them into their nest. They also steal them from each other’s nests. This is a normal behavior. Even when we offer more they still will steal from each other. Thanks for watching!

    Comment by pschaller — October 21, 2009 @ 4:44 pm

  6. OMG, this site is awesome! Penguins FTW! I suppose you/they have regular feeding times?

    Comment by Dave — October 27, 2009 @ 3:53 pm

  7. It’s K, I found it. Sez every day at 10:30am and 3:30pm. Kewl :-)

    Comment by Dave — October 29, 2009 @ 12:10 pm

  8. These are fascinating creatures. A couple of questions: do they mate for only a season, or do they form longer-lasting relationships? And is there any rule-of-thumb we can use to differentiate male from female, as is one is usually larger than the other?

    Comment by Susan — November 2, 2009 @ 10:43 am

  9. Hi Susan,The african penguin is a monogomous species. Pairs form a bond between ages 2-4 years old and generally stay together for the rest of their lives. The sexes look the same. However, if you observe a male/female pair often the male is slightly larger.

    Comment by pschaller — November 4, 2009 @ 10:10 am

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