in Sao Tome
Associate Curator and Director of the Center for Comparative Genomics
Evolutionary processes, Genomics, Phylogenetics, Hybridization

The Simison lab investigates the processes that generate, maintain, and reduce biodiversity. In particular, we are interested in the process of speciation. We use comparative genomics techniques such as RADseq, Ultra Conserved Elements, transcriptomics, and whole genomes to study the role of admixture and introgression in speciation. We are currently focusing on the globally invasive red eared slider turtle system (Trachemys scripta elegans) native to North America.

Michelle Trautwein
Assistant Curator of Entomology and Schlinger Chair of Diptera
Evolution and Diversification of Flies
Curatorial Assistant, Anthropology
Director of Collections and Senior Collections Manager, Botany
Darrell Ubick
Curatorial Assistant III, Entomology
Arachnology
Dr. Adrian Van Allen, Research Associate
Research Associate, Anthropology
Cultural Anthropology, Material Culture of Museum Genomics, Museum Studies, Environmental Anthropology

My research as a cultural anthropologist examines the scientific cultures within museums. I study how museum collections are currently being re-evaluated as sites for mining new kinds of data across disciplines, such as genetic sampling or as preserved cultural heritage. My ethnographic research explores the behind-the-scenes spaces of museums, where I work alongside scientists in the collections, laboratories and biorepositories to study the cultural practices of collecting, preserving and understanding the diversity of life.

Curatorial Assistant, Birds and Mammals and Herpetology

I received my M.S. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from San Francisco State University in 2013, studying avian malaria in Alaskan Black-capped Chickadees. At CAS, I focus on curatorial projects and specimen preparation.

Department Chair and Curator of Invertebrate Zoology and Geology
Deep-sea and coral reef octocorals - systematics and evolution

Research interests include the systematics and evolutionary biology of octocorals (soft corals, gorgonians, and pennatulaceans), which comprise 65% of all coral species diversity. Fieldwork is currently focused on two bathymetrically opposite regions of the world's oceans: coral reefs of the tropical western Pacific (the Philippines, Melanesia, and Micronesia), and the deep-sea benthos (particularly the west coast of North America and various deep ocean basins worldwide).

Alison Young
Citizen Science Manager
Citizen Science, Marine Biology, Intertidal Ecology

My colleagues and I engage volunteers – “citizen scientists” – in discovering, observing, and documenting biodiversity. From creating a complete current plant record and herbarium collection of Mt. Tamalpais, to monitoring species along California’s incredible and diverse coastline, to bringing the public together to bioblitz local parks and open spaces, we give people opportunities to connect to the outdoors, to science, and to each other.

Curatorial Assistant II, Entomology

Research Areas

Encyrtidae of California

The Encyrtidae (Hymenoptera) comprise one of the most important groups of insects used for the biological control of economic pests. However there has never been a systematic attempt to characterize the Nearctic fauna. As a preliminary to such a study, I am compiling a checklist of the species found in California, including both native species as well as those established here in biocontrol programs.

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