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Students will explore tectonic plate boundaries and different types of seismic waves generated by earthquakes.

Using a model, students will construct explanations for one of the reasons why fish populations are declining.

Where are our rainforests? Why are they there?

What types of natural resources are used to make the objects we use in everyday life? Play bingo to find out!

By building your own seismograph to document shaking, you'll learn how scientists measure earthquake intensity.

Where IS all of our planet's water stored?

How can you turn a snail, worm, or roly-poly into an object of inquiry for a young learner? Ask a few questions!

You can make and test predictions using the simplest of invertebrates.

Want to play a board game to learn about rock formation? Explore geologic processes, fast and slow.

By conducting a survey of an outdoor environment, students will design solutions for preventing marine debris.

What kinds of everyday objects contain carbon? This introductory activity will help you get it straight!

How does the finite amount of carbon on this planet move around in the environment, from one place to another?

Can you create a model of how carbon flows between the biosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and lithosphere?

What are the problems associated with burning fossil fuels?

What are the consequences of mining for fossil fuels?

By sorting our waste into different bins, we can make a huge impact.

Can we use a model to predict the impacts of nutrient pollutants on an aquatic ecosystem?

Observations inspire scientific questions and drive discoveries. Explore seasonal primary productivity on Earth!

In this activity, students will be transformed into strategically low-impact world travelers.

In this activity, students gain insight into the challenges associated with meeting various design requirements.

In this two-day lesson, students explore several issues surrounding our current global food system.

Practice rapid ideation—an important step in design thinking—by brainstorming solutions to food systems issues.

In this activity, students will work together to weigh potential solutions to global food system issues.

Design Thinking Challenge: Are your students ready to tackle a food system issue at home or in their school?

Students contextualize a design problem by examining the water consumption of smartphones, boots, and chocolate.

In this two-day lesson, students explore several issues surrounding global water use and conservation.

Practice rapid ideation—an important step in design thinking—by brainstorming solutions to global water issues.

In this activity, students will work together to weigh potential solutions to water use and conservation issues.

Design Thinking Challenge: Are your students ready to tackle a water issue at home or in their school?

Students will practice distinguishing between correlation and causation within the context of climate change.

Challenge your students to design an efficient bus system for a fictitious town.

What factors and constraints do we have to consider when designing a renewable energy plan for a community?

In this lesson, students explore the benefits and drawbacks of nuclear energy to decide if it's worth the risk.

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