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Anoushka Takla's fourth graders seek to answer the question: "What happens to our trash over time?"

Could you describe the kelp forest food web as a system?

What kinds of everyday objects contain carbon? This introductory activity will help you get it straight!

How does the finite amount of carbon on this planet move around in the environment, from one place to another?

Can you create a model of how carbon flows between the biosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and lithosphere?

By building an edible polyp, you'll learn about coral anatomy and discover if it's a plant or an animal.

Where are our rainforests? Why are they there?

Where IS all of our planet's water stored?

Learn about adaptation by creating an insect that can survive in a specific habitat!

In this inquiry-based activity, students test different materials to see which is best to clean up an oil spill.

In this role-playing skit your students will describe the various processes of the water cycle in the Amazon.

How much of outer space is just space?

Do you know the relative sizes of the planets in our solar system? Put yourself to the test with some Play-doh.

Featuring over 40 activities, this guide will get your students outside throughout the year!

Learn about what macroinvertebrates live in your school yard!

Show off your Manor, and make it more appealing to a diversity of macroinvertebrates!

You may know your zodiac sign, but do you know your birthday stars?

Students will practice being Earth to learn about how our orbit affects what we see.

This interactive lesson will demonstrate the difference between "rotation" and "orbit."

This interactive activity will demonstrate why some planets look like they are traveling backwards.

Learn about the phases of the moon with this tactile activity!

What types of natural resources are used to make the objects we use in everyday life? Play bingo to find out!

Through scientific sketching, you can identify patterns in traits shared by a species and get to know variation.

Have you ever wondered how scientists answer questions about the world around them?

By conducting a survey of an outdoor environment, students will design solutions for preventing marine debris.

Why does some trash change, while other garbage stays the same?

Want to play a board game to learn about rock formation? Explore geologic processes, fast and slow.

Let's compare the different objects in outer space!

Discover the part of the leaf that allows for gas exchange!

Learn what it takes to develop, grow and consume some of the foods and water we need.

Using a model, students will construct explanations for one of the reasons why fish populations are declining.

Students will explore tectonic plate boundaries and different types of seismic waves generated by earthquakes.

Track the sun's position to learn the cardinal directions.

How does the digestive system of a zebra differ from that of a buffalo?

How much freshwater was used to produce your meal today?

What are the problems associated with burning fossil fuels?

What are the consequences of mining for fossil fuels?

By sorting our waste into different bins, we can make a huge impact.

Explore seaweed and learn about this important producer in this hands-on, culinary activity!

Investigate why flowers have different shapes and colors.

Ask questions about the light phenomenon called refraction while you explore the Academy exhibits!

Learn how you and your students can help protect primates.

Students will learn about real-world issues involved in making conservation plans to save endangered species.

Erica Katz's fifth graders seek to answer the question: "Why does the moon look different on different days?"

Students receive their science notebooks and take the time to make them their own.

Students peruse sample pages from the notebooks of many different scientists.

Expand your vocabulary in this creative brainstorming activity.

Students draw their idea of "a scientist doing science."

What are some strategies for allowing your students to share the content in their science notebooks?

Students insert a Table of Contents, number the pages, and complete their first reflective entry.

What makes a good scientific sketch? You can teach this lesson even if you think you can't draw!

Use "windowpanes" to take stock of materials at the beginning of an investigative unit.

Lay the foundation for sketching by explicitly teaching the following techniques.

Chew, Bite, Chop into a yummy lesson!

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